It’s a sit-stand world

Around the halls of Ergotron, sit-stand continues to be a passionate discussion. Apparently we are not alone! The following is an excerpt of some recent sit-stand happenings around the world, led by people you’ll want to follow. Just kick back, stand for a moment, and read on. ISBNPA_June

JacMair_ISBNPAIt’s Day 3 of the International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) Conference in Edinburgh, Scotland, where organizers are sending a clear message about the importance of reducing sedentary time. An entire section of the auditorium at the Edinburgh International Conference Center has been designated “stand only” for the 1,200 people from 44 countries who are gathering to examine health issues concerning physical activity, nutrition and sedentary behavior.

Ergotron is exhibiting at the Conference and Satellite Meetings, highlighting the sit-stand solutions that are changing how the world works. “Patterns of Sustainability of Sit-Stand Workstation Use in A Typical Workplace” is a poster Ergotron research manager, Carrie Schmitz presented along with Jacqueline Mair, from the Centre for Physical Activity and Health Research, Ulster University.

CheltFestAlso in the UK today, a lively presentation in Cheltenham Sci Festival, Sitting: The Lazy Killer, featuring Roger Highfield, Dr. Michael Mosley (pictured in tweet) and scientist John Buckley. They are discussed the parameters of a sit-stand lifestyle, and how to break up extended hours of sitting each day.

Next week, on 8 June, Peacock Bros. is hosting Dr. David Dunstan, from Baker IDI Heart & Diabetes Institute in Melbourne, Australia. Dunstan will be presenting the latest research on the health hazards of prolonged sitting and what we can do about it. Baker IDI is holding its first annual On Your Feet Australia day 11 June; follow along on Twitter with the #quitthesit hashtag.

QuittheSit

The implications of research into sedentary behavior is significant for heart and diabetes prevention. The American Diabetes Association, which recommends people change sitting or standing postures every 90 minutes as an aspect of the Standards of Care, launched its first annual Get Fit Don’t Sit event in May, receiving tremendous national response from businesses, who took the Pledge and encouraged healthier workstyles for their employees.

Get Britain Standing, at the Active Working Summit in January, released news about a joint statement from researchers in sedentary behavior. The statement was published this week in the British Journal of Sports Medicine (abstract), and urges companies to adopt workplace and wellness practices that break up sedentary aspects of office culture. They recommend office workers spend at least two hours of their working day standing or moving, and gradually progress to four hours. This is the first statement of this kind from the broader research community. Get Britain Standing has also just launched a Get America Standing site, and is planning an On Your Feet America day in April 2016.

Have sit-stand news to share? Contact us at info@juststand.org or see relevant worldwide news daily at @juststandnews.

 

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